Buy Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover) in United States - Cartnear.com

Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)

CTNR803491 09781683950035 CTNR803491

Linon

Linon
2023-12-08 USD 62.7

$ 62.70 $ 66.00

Item Added to Cart

*Product availability is subject to suppliers inventory

Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)
SHIPPING ALL OVER UNITED STATES
Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)
100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)
EASY 30 DAYSRETURNS & REFUNDS
Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)
24/7 CUSTOMER SUPPORT
Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)
TRUSTED AND SAFE WEBSITE
Latoya Ruby Frazier: The Notion of Family (Signed Edition) - (Hardcover)
100% SECURE CHECKOUT
Number of Pages: 156
Genre: Photography
Sub-Genre: Individual Photographers
Format: Hardcover
Publisher: Aperture Direct
Age Range: Adult
Book theme: Monographs
Language: English



About the Book



In this, her first book, LaToya Ruby Frazier (born 1982) offers an incisive exploration of the legacy of racism and economic decline in America's small towns, as embodied by Braddock, Pennsylvania, Frazier's hometown. The work also considers the impact of that decline on the community and on her family, creating a statement both personal and truly political-- an intervention in the histories and narratives of the region that are dominated by stories of Andrew Carnegie and Pittsburgh's industrial past, but largely ignore those of black families and the working classes. Frazier has set her story of three generations-- her Grandma Ruby, her mother and herself-- against larger questions of civic belonging and responsibility.



Book Synopsis



In this, her first book, LaToya Ruby Frazier (born 1982) offers an incisive exploration of the legacy of racism and economic decline in America's small towns, as embodied by Braddock, Pennsylvania, Frazier's hometown. The work also considers the impact of that decline on the community and on her family, creating a statement both personal and truly political--an intervention in the histories and narratives of the region that are dominated by stories of Andrew Carnegie and Pittsburgh's industrial past, but largely ignore those of black families and the working classes. Frazier has set her story of three generations--her Grandma Ruby, her mother and herself--against larger questions of civic belonging and responsibility. The work also documents the demise of Braddock's only hospital, reinforcing the idea that the history of a place is frequently written on the body as well as the landscape. With "The Notion of Family," Frazier knowingly acknowledges and expands upon the traditions of classic black-and-white documentary photography, enlisting the participation of her family, and her mother in particular. As Frazier says, her mother is "co-author, artist, photographer and subject. Our relationship primarily exists through a process of making images together. I see beauty in all her imperfections and abuse." Frazier's work reinforces the idea of image-making as a transformative act, a means of resetting traditional power dynamics and narratives, both those of her family and those of the community at large. Frazier is a 2014 Guggenheim fellow.



Review Quotes




In her first book, Frazier explores themes of economic inequity, racism and personal politics through three generations of her own family, and documents the tolls that big injustices can have on small families and communities alike.--Phil Bicker"TIME Lightbox" (09/08/2014)

The first photograph after the title page in this book is a tightly cropped shot of a welcome sign for "Historic Braddock" (sponsored jointly by three companies that make air fresheners, odor control products, and do pest control). The second is an expansive aerial view of Braddock's historic steel mill; the third a portrait of Frazier, topless, her hair messy and her gaze unflinching. In three strokes, the artist maps the terrain of her exploration: the family not only as a personal unit but as a broader community, existing in the wider world and intractably affected by it. Frazier's challenging and haunting photographs have previously brought this story to museums and galleries, but in this, her first book, she adds writing to create a powerfully stark family portrait. The brilliance of this volume, and Frazier's work, is in the way it manages to be both documentary and art, deeply intimate and widely important, relentless but so very necessary.--Jillian Steinhauer"Hyperallergic" (12/31/2014)

Related Products

See More

You May Also Like

See More