Buy The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by Evangeline Booth (Paperback) in United States - Cartnear.com

The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by Evangeline Booth (Paperback)

CTNR801899 09781618954749 CTNR801899

Box Partners

Box Partners
2023-12-06 USD 14.11

$ 14.11 $ 14.25

Item Added to Cart

*Product availability is subject to suppliers inventory

The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by  Evangeline Booth (Paperback)
SHIPPING ALL OVER UNITED STATES
The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by  Evangeline Booth (Paperback)
100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by  Evangeline Booth (Paperback)
EASY 30 DAYSRETURNS & REFUNDS
The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by  Evangeline Booth (Paperback)
24/7 CUSTOMER SUPPORT
The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by  Evangeline Booth (Paperback)
TRUSTED AND SAFE WEBSITE
The War Romance of the Salvation Army - by  Evangeline Booth (Paperback)
100% SECURE CHECKOUT
Number of Pages: 242
Genre: Fiction + Literature Genres
Sub-Genre: Classics
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Bibliotech Press
Age Range: Adult
Author: Evangeline Booth
Language: English



Book Synopsis



Evangeline Cory Booth, original name Eva Cory Booth, (born Dec. 25, 1865, London, Eng.--died July 17, 1950, Hartsdale, N.Y., U.S.), Anglo-American Salvation Army leader whose dynamic administration expanded that organization's services and funding and who became its fourth general.


In 1889, at the age of 23, she was given charge of the Salvation Army's International Training College in Clapton and put in command of all Salvation Army forces in the home counties (London and the surrounding area). She became the Salvation Army's principal troubleshooter as well, and in 1896, when her older brother Ballington Booth and his wife, Maud, threatened to break away from rule, Eva effectively took over command of the shaken organization.

It was on her arrival in the United States that she adopted the name Evangeline as more dignified. She then proceeded to Toronto, where she took command of the Salvation Army in Canada. In 1904 Booth became commander of the Salvation Army in the United States. In that post her administrative skills flourished. New forms of social service were instituted, including hospitals for unwed mothers, a chain of "Evangeline Residences" for working women, homes for the aged, and, during World War I, canteens featuring "doughnuts for doughboys." (Her services to the war effort won her a Distinguished Service Medal in 1919.)

Under her personal supervision the Salvation Army quickly developed disaster relief services following the San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906. She abandoned the organization's tradition of street begging and set up instead an efficient system of fund-raising. Booth was successful in enlisting the open support of a great many distinguished and wealthy public figures, and the first national drive in 1919 raised $16 million. The rapid growth of the Salvation Army and the proliferation of its services and facilities necessitated the establishment of four regional commands, but she remained in clear control from her New York headquarters. Booth's only political involvement was to throw the weight of the Salvation Army behind the movement for prohibition and against the later movement for repeal. Her popularity was such that in 1922 the general of the Salvation Army, her eldest brother, Bramwell Booth, abandoned the policy of rotation and allowed her to remain in charge in the United States. In 1923 she became a naturalized citizen. In 1934 she became the fourth general of the Salvation Army and the last member of the Booth family to hold world command. She retired five years later. Among her published works are The War Romance of the Salvation Army (1919), with Grace Livingston Hill; Songs of the Evangel (1927), a collection of hymns she composed; Toward a Better World (1928); and Woman (1930). (britannica.com)

Related Products

See More